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SPRING

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4k transferred to full HD video │ 19ʼ58"│ sound │ color │ 2012

"four poems for a voice and various sounds"

SPRING is a collection of poetry, musical scores and a cinematic structure, exploring the notions of oppression and resistance. The title SPRING doesn’t mean Spring-time, however it doesn’t exclude itself from a notion of a Spring-time. It also doesn’t exclude itself from a meanings such are Spring-the mechanical device, Spring-the political movement, Spring-the release from a constrained position, Spring-to come into being; rather it establishes itself between all those meanings.

Film follows the reading of four poems, each dwelling on a different subject, yet entangled together by their complex system of meanings. Reading of the poems itself propels another major mechanism of the SPRING: words dangerously leaning towards incomprehension, while retaining the power of their meaning by "other" means. Filmed in a black box-constructed set, scenes follow contractions, twisting, balancing and dangers in the movements of a human body. It is not about dance or choreography. It is about human voice that projects itself onto bodies, which are in some way alien, external to the voice itself. Imagine the voice that doesn’t belong to a human anymore, as if it has escaped the vocal apparatus and mouth of its owner and now, it slides through the corners of space. There, it finds contracted bodies, legs precariously balancing on the rope, hands instead of legs grappling the ground. It also finds a wide-open mouth from where a light appears. It is an image of a performer pulling the neon tube out of his throat.

Further, each poem is interrupted by a seemingly unrelated scene of a volcanic landscape. But each time the volcano reappears throughout the film it utters a different acoustic landscape: from silence to roars to language.

SPRING is commissioned by Palais de Tokyo for my solo exhibition "The Kingdom of Glottis" at Palais de Tokyo (2012).