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The Moon shall never take my Voice

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HD video │ 19ʼ16” │ sound │ color │ 2010

“Three songs for a muted voice and various sounds”

The Moon shall never take my Voice observes a deaf woman performing three acts in a distorted sign language, revealing a distinctive, ulterior form of music derived from the semantic property of the performed text. Though the words remain unspoken, their meaning is underlined by an acoustic expression in a slap-stick manner precisely bound to the movements of the performer.

First song unfolds the event that took place in NYC in the year 1907, the cortége of a deceased fire chief. Gustav Mahler, an Austrian composer observed the procession passing by his hotel room. He noticed that the disturbing rhythm of the Grand Military Drum had a prolonged interval of silence in between each stroke. Later he used this intervals of the silence in his unfinished tenth symphony, reveling the incredible power of absence as musical mechanism.

Second song describes the day when John Cage visited Harvard University un-echoing chamber. After experiencing the room Cage realized that the noise of his own body makes it difficult to grasp the concept of silence, and composed 4ʼ33”.

Third and the final song is about the Astronaut. When Neil Armstrong spoke his famous sentence (one small step for (a) man..) unintentionally, he made a mistake slipping out the vocal “a” which had to be pronounced in front of the word “man”, thus changing the meaning of the whole sentence. The fact that the moon has no air, and no sound can ever exist on the moon, makes it the only silent place ever visited by man. What unfolds is a fiction tale composed of fragments from the interviews given on different occasions by Neil Armstrong and a projection of the imagined sound describing the image of the whole universe visible from the moon.